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Scripture and Tradition? Where does Tradition stand?

Loutzenhiser's picture

We will continue the 2 Tim and 1 Thess here. I will bring the last posts from each thread here.

Let me define the thread subject here. We all agree that Scripture is foundational to the church, but where does tradition stand and what tradition.

Some questions -

Is a tradition considered to be apostolical even though it is announced and defined at a later date?

Must a tradition have some other supporting evidence or is the church's "word" good enough for it to be considered canonical?

Is Dogma tradition or just a church's view?

What support must a tradition have to be canonical? (such as multi-church support?)

Are views and teachings about a tradition also tradition or just a church's opinion?

De Maria's picture

Tradition, canonical

Robert,

We will continue the 2 Tim and 1 Thess here. I will bring the last posts from each thread here.

Let me define the thread subject here. We all agree that Scripture is foundational to the church, but where does tradition stand and what tradition.

Some questions -

Is a tradition considered to be apostolical even though it is announced and defined at a later date?

Do you mean, "have you stopped beating your wife?" This is a loaded question. If I were asked if I had stopped beating my wife, the answer would be I have never beaten my wife.

In the same way, the correct response to your question is that all traditions are apostolic and they were revealed in apostolic times. And just as many of the doctrines which you currently believe, the Church came to a deeper understanding in the course of time and defined them later.

Must a tradition have some other supporting evidence or is the church's "word" good enough for it to be considered canonical?

It must not contradict Scripture, it must not contradict Tradition.

Is Dogma tradition or just a church's view?

Dogma is doctrine which is defined.

What support must a tradition have to be canonical? (such as multi-church support?)

Scripture and Tradition.

It must be in conformity or explicitly in Scripture. And it must be observed in the Traditions of the Church.

Are views and teachings about a tradition also tradition or just a church's opinion?

That depends. If the views are canonically defined in ecumenical council, they are Tradition.

If they are simply a Catholic speaking privately upon something which has not been defined by Papal decree or ecumenical Council, then they are not Tradition, but tradition. A prime example is "Limbo".




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