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NPNF2-03. Theodoret, Jerome, Gennadius, & Rufinus: Historical Writings
Book information

Table of Contents

Title Page.

Preface.

The Ecclesiastical History, Dialogues, and Letters of Theodoret.

Title Page.

Translator's Preface.

Chronological Tables to accompany the History and Life of Theodoret.

Prolegomena.

Manuscripts and Editions of Separate Works.

The Anathemas of Cyril in Opposition to Nestorius.

Counter-statements of Theodoret.

The Ecclesiastical History of Theodoret.

Book I

Prologue.--Design of the History.

Origin of the Arian Heresy.

List of the Principal Bishops.

The Epistle of Alexander, Bishop of Alexandria to Alexander, Bishop of Constantinople.

The Letter of Arius to Eusebius, Bishop of Nicomedia.

The Letter of Eusebius, Bishop of Nicomedia, to Paulinus, Bishop of Tyre.

General Council of Nicæa.

Confutation of Arianism deduced from the Writings of Eustathius and Athanasius.

Facts relating to Meletius the Egyptian, from whom originated the Meletian Schism, which remains to this day.--Synodical Epistle respecting him.

The Epistle of the Emperor Constantine, concerning the matters transacted at the Council, addressed to those Bishops who were not present.

The daily wants of the Church supplied by the Emperor, and an account of his other virtues.

Letter of Eusebius on the effrontery of the Arians

Confutation of the blasphemies of the Arians of our time, from the writings of Eusebius, Bishop of Cæsarea.

Extract from the Letter of Athanasius on the Death of Arius.

Letter written by the Emperor Constantine respecting the building of Churches.

The Epistle of Constantine concerning the preparation of copies of the Holy Scriptures.

Letter from the Emperor to Macarius, Bishop of Jerusalem, concerning the building of the Holy Church.

Helena, Mother of the Emperor Constantine.--Her zeal in the Erection of the Holy Church.

The Unlawful Translation of Eusebius, Bishop of Nicomedia.

Epistle of the Emperor Constantine against Eusebius and Theognis, addressed to the Nicomedians.

The artful Machinations of Eusebius and his followers against the Holy Eustathius, Bishop of Antioch.

Bishops of Heretical opinions ordained in Antioch after the Banishment of St. Eustathius.

Conversion of the Indians.

Conversion of the Iberians.

Letter written by the Emperor Constantine to Sapor, the King of Persia, respecting the Christians.

An account of the plot formed against the Holy Athanasius.

Another plot against Athanasius.

Epistle of the Emperor Constantine to the Council of Tyre.

The Council of Tyre.

Consecration of the Church of Jerusalem.--Banishment of St. Athanasius.

Will of the blessed Emperor Constantine.

Apology for Constantine.

The End of the Holy Emperor Constantine.

Book II

Return of St. Athanasius.

Declension of the Emperor Constantius from the true Faith.

Second Exile of St. Athanasius.--Ordination and Death of Gregorius.

Paulus, Bishop of Constantinople.

The Heresy of Macedonius.

Council held at Sardica.

Account of the Bishops Euphratas and Vincentius, and of the plot formed in Antioch against them.

Stephanus Deposed.

The Second Return of Saint Athanasius.

Third exile and flight of Athanasius.

The evil and daring deeds done by Georgius in Alexandria.

Council of Milan.

Conference between Liberius, Pope of Rome, and the Emperor Constantius.

Concerning the Banishment and Return of the Holy Liberius.

Council of Ariminum.

Concerning the Synod held at Nica in Thrace, and the Confession of Faith drawn up there.

Synodical Act of Damasus, Bishop of Rome, and of the Western Bishops, about the Council at Ariminum.

The Letter of Athanasius, Bishop of Alexandria, concerning the same Council.

Concerning the cunning of Leontius, Bishop of Antioch, and the boldness of Flavianus and Diodorus.

Concerning the innovations of Eudoxius, of Germanicia, and the zeal of Basilius of Ancyra, and of Eustathius of Sebasteia against him.

Of the Second Council of Nicæa.

Of the Council held at Seleucia in Isauria.

Of what befell the orthodox bishops at Constantinople.

Synodical Epistle written against Aetius.

Of the causes which separated the Eunomians from the Arians.

Of the siege of the city of Nisibis, and the apostolic conversation of Bishop Jacobus.

Of the Council of Antioch and what was done there against the holy Meletius.

About Eusebius, Bishop of Samosata.

Book III

Book IV

Of the reign and piety of Jovianus.

Of the return of Athanasius.

Synodical letter to the Emperor Jovian concerning the Faith.

Of the restoration of allowances to the churches; and of the Emperor's death.

Of the reign of Valentinianus, and how he associated Valens his brother with him.

Of the election of Ambrosius, the Bishop of Milan.

Letters of the Emperors Valentinianus and Valens, written to the diocese of Asia about the Homoüsion, on hearing that some men in Asia and in Phrygia were in dispute about the divine decree.

Synodical Epistle of the Synod in Illyricum concerning the Faith.

Of the heresy of the Audiani.

Of the heresy of the Messaliani.

In what manner Valens fell into heresy.

How Valens exiled the virtuous bishops.

Of Eusebius, bishop of Samosata, and others.

Of the holy Barses, and of the exile of the bishop of Edessa and his companions.

Of the persecution which took place at Edessa, and of Eulogius and Protogenes, presbyters of Edessa.

Of the holy Basilius, Bishop of Cæsarea, and the measures taken against him by Valens and the prefect Modestus.

Of the death of the great Athanasius and the election of Petrus.

On the overthrow of Petrus and the introduction of Lucius the Arian.

Narrative of events at Alexandria in the time of Lucius the Arian, taken from a letter of Petrus, Bishop of Alexandria.

Of Mavia, Queen of the Saracens, and the ordination of Moses the monk.

Persecution at Constantinople and Antioch

How Flavianus and Diodorus gathered the church of the orthodox in Antioch.

Of the holy monk Aphraates.

Of the holy monk Julianus.

Of what other monks were distinguished at this period.

Of Didymus of Alexandria and Ephraim the Syrian.

Of what bishops were at this time distinguished in Asia and Pontus.

Of the letter written by Valens to the great Valentinianus about the war, and how he replied.

Of the piety of Count Terentius.

Of the bold utterance of Trajanus the general.

Of Isaac the monk of Constantinople and Bretanio the Scythian Bishop.

Of the expedition of Valens against the Goths and how he paid the penalty of his impiety.

How the Goths became tainted by the Arian error.

Book V

Of the piety of the emperor Gratianus.

Of the return of the bishops.

Of the dissension caused by Paulinus; of the innovation by Apollinarius of Laodicea, and of the philosophy of Meletius.

Of Eusebius Bishop of Samosata.

Of the campaign of Theodosius.

Of the reign of Theodosius and of his dream.

Of famous leaders of the Arian faction.

The council assembled at Constantinople.

Synodical letter from the council at Constantinople.

Synodical letter of Damasus bishop of Rome against Apollinarius and Timotheus.

A confession of the Catholic faith which Pope Damasus sent to Bishop Paulinus in Macedonia when he was at Thessalonica.

Of the death of Gratianus and the sovereignty of Maximus.

Of Justina, the wife of Valentinianus, and of her plot against Ambrosius.

Of the information given by Maximus the tyrant to Valentinianus.

Of the Letter written by the Emperor Theodosius concerning the same.

Of Amphilochius, bishop of Iconium.

Of the massacre of Thessalonica; the boldness of Bishop Ambrosius, and the piety of the Emperor.

Of the Empress Placilla.

Of the sedition of Antioch.

Of the destruction of the temples all over the Empire.

Of Marcellus, bishop of Apamea, and the idols' temples destroyed by him.

Of Theophilus, bishop of Alexandria, and what happened at the demolition of the idols in that city.

Of Flavianus bishop of Antioch and of the sedition which arose in the western Church on account of Paulinus.

Of the tyranny of Eugenius and the victory won through faith by the Emperor Theodosius.

Of the death of the Emperor Theodosius.

Of Honorius the emperor and Telemachus the monk.

Of the piety of the emperor Arcadius and the ordination of John Chrysostom.

Of John's boldness for God.

Of the idol temples which were destroyed by John in Phœnicia.

Of the church of the Goths.

Of his care for the Scythians and his zeal against the Marcionists.

Of the demand made by Gainas and of John Chrysostom's reply.

Of the ambassage of Chrysostom to Gainas.

Of the events which happened on account of Chrysostom.

Of Alexander, bishop of Antioch.

Of the removal of the remains of John and of the faith of Theodosius and his sisters.

Of Theodotus bishop of Antioch.

Of the persecutions in Persia and of them that were martyred there.

Of Theodorus, bishop of Mopsuestia.

Dialogues. The “Eranistes” or “Polymorphus” of the Blessed Theodoretus, Bishop of Cyrus.

Letters of the Blessed Theodoret, Bishop of Cyprus.

To an Unknown Correspondent.

To the Same.

To Bishop Irenæus.

Festal.

Festal.

Festal.

To Theonilla.

To Eugraphia.

To an Anonymous Correspondent.

To the Learned Elias.

To Flavianus Bishop of Constantinople.

To the Bishop Irenæus.

To Cyrus.

To Alexandra.

To Silvanus the Primate.

To Bishop Irenæus.

To the Deaconess Casiana.

To Neoptolemus.

To the Presbyter Basilius.

To the Presbyter Martyrius.

To the Learned Eusebius.

To Count Ulpianus.

To the Patrician Areobindas.

To Andreas Bishop of Samosata.

Festal.

Festal.

To Aquilinus, Deacon and Archimandrite.

To Jacobus, Presbyter and Monk.

To Apellion.

To Aerius the Sophist.

To Domnus Bishop of Antioch.

To the Bishop Theoctistus.

To Stasimus, Count and Primate.

To the Count Patricius.

To the Bishop Irenæus.

To Pompianus, Bishop of Emesa.

To Salustius the Governor.

Festal.

Festal.

To Theodorus the Vicar.

To Claudianus.

To Constantius the Prefect.

To the Augusta Pulcheria.

To the Patrician Senator.

To the Patrician Anatolius.

To the Learned Petrus.

To Proclus, Bishop of Constantinople.

To Eustathius, Bishop of Berytus.

To Damianus, Bishop of Sidon.

To the Archimandrite Gerontius.

To the Presbyter Agapius.

To Ibas, Bishop of Edessa.

To Sophronius, Bishop of Constantina.

Festal.

Festal.

Festal.

To the Præfect Eutrechius.

To the Consul Nomus.

To Claudianus.

To Dioscorus, Bishop of Alexandria.

To the Presbyter Archibius.

To the Presbyter John.

Festal.

Festal.

To the General Zeno.

To Aerius the Sophist.

To Maranas.

To Epiphanius.

To Eugraphia.

To Eustathius, Bishop of Ægæ.

To Zeno, General and Consul.

To Hermesigenes the Assessor.

To Apollonius.

To Urbanus.

To the Clergy of Berœa.

To Uranius, Governor of Cyprus.

To Eulalius, Bishop of Persian Armenia.

To Eusebius, Bishop of Persian Armenia.

To Anatolius the Patrician.

To the Prefect Eutrechius.

To the Consul Nomus.

To Eusebius, Bishop of Ancyra.

Of Theodoretus, Bishop of Cyrus, to Dioscorus, Archbishop of Alexandria.

To the Bishops of Cilicia.

To the Bishop Basil.

To Flavianus, Bishop of Constantinople.

To Domnus, Bishop of Apamea.

To Taurus the Patrician.

To Florentius the Patrician.

To Lupicinus the Master.

To the Prefect Eutrechius.

To Anatolius the Patrician.

To Senator the Patrician.

To Protogenes The Præfect.

To the Præfect Antiochus.

To Nomus the Patrician.

To the CountSporacius.

To Pancharius.

To Claudianus the Antigrapharius.

To Alexandra.

To the Deaconess Celarina.

To Bishop Basilius.

To the Count Apollonius.

To Flavianus, Bishop of Constantinople.

To Eulogius the Œconomus.

To Abraham the Œconomus.

To the Presbyter Theodotus.

To Acacius the Presbyter.

To Eusebius, Bishop of Ancyra.

To Domnus, Bishop of Antioch.

To Anatolius the Patrician.

To Domnus, Bishop of Antioch.

To Leo, Bishop of Rome.

From Pope Leo to Theodoret.

To Andiberis.

To Apella.

To the Presbyter Renatus.

To the Bishop Florentius.

To the Archdeacon of Rome.

To Anatolius the Patrician.

To Lupicius.

To Anatolius the Patrician.

To Uranius Bishop of Emesa.

To the Same.

To the Learned Maranas.

To Aphthonius, Theodoritus, Nonnus, Scylacius, Apthonius, Joannes, Magistrates of the Zeugmatensis.

To the Bishop Sabinianus.

To Jobius, Presbyter and Archimandrite.

To Candidus, Presbyter and Archimandrite.

To Magnus Antoninus the Presbyter.

To Bishop Timotheus.

To Longinus, Archimandrite of Doliche.

To Ibas, Bishop of Edessa.

To John, Bishop of Germanicia.

To Theoctistus, Bishop of Berœa.

To Bishop Romulus.

To Cyrus Magistrianus.

To the Archimandrite John.

To Anatolius the Patrician.

To Aspar, Consular and Patrician.

To the Master Vincomalus.

To Marcellus, Archimandrite of the Acoemetæ.

To the Same.

To Andrew, Monk of Constantinople.

To the Soldiers.

To the Monks of Constantinople.

To John the Œconomus.

To John, Bishop of Germanicia.

in the Edition of Garnerius.

Copy of the Letter written by John, Bishop of Antioch, to Nestorius.

Letter of Theodoretus, Bishop of Cyrus, to Joannes, Bishop of Antioch.

Letter or Address of Theodoret to the Monks of the Euphratensian, the Osrhoene, Syria, Phœnicia, and Cilicia.

Report of the (Bishops) of the East to the Emperor, giving information of their proceedings, and explaining the cause of the delay in the arrival of the Bishop of Antioch.

Report of the same to the Empresses Pulcheria and Eudoxia.

Report of the same to the Senate of Constantinople.

Letter of John, Bishop of Antioch and his Supporters, to the Clergy of Constantinople.

Letter of the same to the people of Constantinople.

Report of the Council of (the Bishops of) the East to the Victorious Emperor, announcing a second time the deposition of Cyril and of Memnon.

Report of (the Bishops of) the East to the Very Pious Emperor, which they delivered with the preceding Report to the Right Honourable Count Irenæus.

Letter of the same to the Præfect and to the Master.

Letter of the same to the Governor and Scholasticus.

Report presented to the Emperor by John, Archbishop of Antioch and his supporters through Palladius Magistrianus.

Letter of Theodoretus to Andreas, Bishop of Samosata, written from Ephesus.

First Letter of the Commissioners of the East, sent to Chalcedon, among whom was Theodoretus.

Second Epistle of the same to the same, expressing premature triumph in Victory.

Letter of the same to the same.

First Petition of the Commissioners, addressed from Chalcedon, to the Emperor.

Second Petition of the same, sent from Chalcedon to Theodosius Augustus.

Third Demand of the same, addressed from Chalcedon to the Sovereigns.

Letter written by Theodoretus, Bishop of Cyrus, from Chalcedon to Alexander of Hierapolis.

Letter of certain Easterns, who had been sent to Constantinople, to Bishop Rufus.

Letter of Theodoret to John, Bishop of Antioch, after the Reconciliation.

Letter of Theodoretus to Nestorius.

Letter to Andreas, Monk of Constantinople.

To Himerius, Bishop of Nicomedia.

To Alexander of Hierapolis.

Letter to the same Alexander after he had learnt that John, Bishop of Antioch, had Anathematized the Doctrine of Nestorius.

Letter to Andreas, Bishop of Samosata.

Letter to Alexander of Hierapolis.

Letter of Cyril to John, Bishop of Antioch, against Theodoret.

Letter of Theodoretus, as some suppose, to Domnus, Bishop of Antioch, written on the Death of Cyril, Bishop of Alexandria.

Letter to Abundius, Bishop of Como.

Jerome and Gennadius. Lives of Illustrious Men.

Title Page.

Introduction.

Jerome. Lives of Illustrious Men.

Preface.

List of Writers.

Simon Peter

James, the brother of our Lord.

Matthew, surnamed Levi.

Jude, the brother of James.

Paul, formerly called Saul.

Barnabas, surnamed Joseph.

Luke, the evangelist.

Mark, the evangelist.

John, the apostle and evangelist.

Hermas.

Philo Judæus.

Lucius Annæus Seneca.

Josephus, son of Matthias.

Justus of Tiberias.

Clemens the bishop.

Ignatius the bishop.

Polycarp the bishop.

Papias the bishop.

Quadratus the bishop.

Aristides the philosopher.

Agrippa Castor.

Hegesippus the historian.

Justin the philosopher.

Melito the bishop.

Theophilus the bishop.

Apollinaris the bishop.

Dionysius the bishop.

Pinytus the bishop.

Tatian the heresiarch.

Philip the bishop.

Musanus.

Modestus.

Bardesanes the heresiarch.

Victor the bishop.

Irenæus the bishop.

Pantaenus the philosopher.

Rhodo, the disciple of Tatian.

Clemens the presbyter.

Miltiades.

Apollonius.

Serapion the bishop.

Apollonius the senator.

Theophilus another bishop.

Bacchylus the bishop.

Polycrates the bishop.

Heraclitus.

Maximus.

Candidus.

Appion.

Sextus.

Arabianus.

Judas.

Tertullian the presbyter.

Origen, surnamed Adamantius.

Ammonius.

Ambrose the deacon.

Trypho the pupil of Origen.

Minucius Felix.

Gaius.

Berillus the bishop.

Hippolytus the bishop.

Alexander the bishop.

Julius the African.

Geminus the presbyter.

Theodorus, surnamed Gregory the bishop.

Cornelius the bishop.

Cyprian the bishop.

Pontius the deacon.

Dionysius the bishop.

Novatianus the heresiarch.

Malchion the presbyter.

Archelaus the bishop.

Anatolius the bishop.

Victorinus the bishop.

Pamphilus the presbyter.

Pierius the presbyter.

Lucianus the presbyter.

Phileas the bishop.

Arnobius the rhetorician.

Firmianus the rhetorician, surnamed Lactantius.

Eusebius the bishop.

Reticus the bishop.

Methodius the bishop.

Juvencus the presbyter.

Eustathius the bishop.

Marcellus the bishop.

Athanasius the bishop.

Antonius the monk.

Basilius the bishop.

Theodorus the bishop.

Eusebius another bishop.

Triphylius the bishop.

Donatus the heresiarch.

Asterius the philosopher.

Lucifer the bishop.

Eusebius another bishop.

Fortunatianus the bishop.

Acacius the bishop.

Serapion the bishop.

Hilary the bishop.

Victorinus the rhetorician.

Titus the bishop.

Damasus the bishop.

Apollinarius the bishop.

Gregory the bishop.

Pacianus the bishop.

Photinus the heresiarch.

Phœbadius the bishop.

Didymus the Blind.

Optatus the bishop.

Acilius Severus the senator.

Cyril the bishop.

Euzoius the bishop.

Epiphanius the bishop.

Ephrem the deacon.

Basil another bishop.

Gregory another bishop.

Lucius the bishop.

Diodorus the bishop.

Eunomius the heresiarch.

Priscillianus the bishop.

Latronianus.

Tiberianus.

Ambrose the bishop.

Evagrius the bishop.

Ambrose the disciple of Didymus.

Maximus, first philosopher, then bishop.

Another Gregory, also a bishop.

John the presbyter.

Gelasius the bishop.

Theotimus the bishop.

Dexter, son of Pacianus, now prætorian prefect.

Amphilochius the bishop.

Sophronius.

Jerome the presbyter.

Gennadius. Lives of Illustrious Men.

List of the Authors whom Gennadius added, after the Death of the Blessed Jerome.

James, surnamed the Wise.

Julius, bishop of Rome.

Paulonas the presbyter.

Vitellius the African.

Macrobius the presbyter.

Heliodorus the presbyter.

Pachomius the presbyter-monk.

Theodorus, his successor.

Oresiesis the monk.

Macarius the monk.

Evagrius the monk.

Theodorus the presbyter.

Prudentius.

Audentius the bishop.

Commodianus.

Faustinus the presbyter.

Rufinus the presbyter.

Tichonius the African.

Severus the presbyter.

Antiochus the bishop.

Severianus the bishop.

Nicaeas the bishop.

Olympius the bishop.

Bachiarius.

Sabbatius the bishop.

Isaac.

Ursinus.

Another Macarius.

Heliodorus the presbyter.

John, bishop of Constantinople.

John, another bishop.

Paulus the bishop.

Helvidius.

Theophilus the bishop.

Eusebius the bishop.

Vigilantius the presbyter.

Simplicianus the bishop.

Vigilius the bishop.

Augustine the bishop.

Orosius the presbyter.

Maximus the bishop.

Petronius the bishop.

Pelagius the heresiarch.

Innocentius the bishop.

Caelestius, follower of Pelagius.

Julianus the bishop.

Lucianus the presbyter.

Avitus the presbyter.

Paulinus the bishop.

Eutropius the presbyter.

Another Evagrius.

Vigilius the deacon.

Atticus the holy bishop.

Nestorius the heresiarch.

Caelestinus the bishop.

Theodotus the bishop.

Fastidius the bishop.

Cyrillus the bishop.

Timotheus the bishop.

Leporius the presbyter.

Victorinus the rhetorician.

Cassianus the deacon.

Philippus the presbyter.

Eucherius the bishop.

Vincentius the Gaul.

Syagrius.

Isaac the presbyter.

Salvianus the presbyter.

Paulinus the bishop.

Hilarius the bishop.

Leo the bishop.

Mochimus the presbyter.

Timotheus the bishop.

Asclepius the bishop.

Peter the presbyter.

Paul the presbyter.

Pastor the bishop.

Victor the bishop.

Voconius the bishop.

Musaeus the presbyter.

Vincentius the presbyter.

Cyrus the monk.

Samuel the presbyter.

Claudianus the presbyter.

Prosper.

Faustus the bishop.

Servus Dei the bishop.

Victorius.

Theodoritus the bishop.

Gennadius the bishop.

Theodulus the presbyter.

Sidonius the bishop.

John the presbyter.

Gelasius the bishop.

Honoratus the bishop.

Cerealis the bishop.

Eugenius the bishop.

Pomerius the bishop.

Gennadius.

Life and Works of Rufinus with Jerome's Apology Against Rufinus.

Title Page.

Prolegomena.

Preface to the Commentary on the Benedictions of the Twelve Patriarchs.

Preface to Book II.

Translation of Pamphilus' Defence of Origen.

Rufinus's Epilogue to Pamphilus the Martyr's Apology for Origen; otherwise The Book Concerning the Adulteration of the Works of Origen.

Preface to the Translations of Origen's Books Περὶ ᾽Αρχῶν.

Preface to Book III. of the Περὶ ᾽Αρχῶν.

Rufinus' Apology in Defence of Himself.

The Letter of Anastasius, Bishop of the Church of Rome to John Bishop of Jerusalem Concerning the Character of Rufinus.

The Apology of Rufinus. Addressed to Apronianus, in Reply to Jerome's Letter to Pammachius.

Preface.

Book I

Epitome of Argument.

I must submit to the taunts of my adversary as Christ did to those of the Jews.

Yet the substantial charges must be answered.

I praised him but he has wounded me.

I am no heretic, but declare my faith, that of my baptism.

I give a further proof of my faith in the resurrection of the flesh.

The resurrection body is a spiritual body.

The resurrection body is a spiritual body.

The resurrection body is a spiritual body.

The resurrection body is a spiritual body.

Origen's doctrines in the Περὶ ᾽Αρχῶν.

What led to the translation.

Pamphilus Apology for Origen.

Pamphilus Apology for Origen.

Preface to the Translation of the Περὶ ᾽Αρχῶν.

Treatise on the Adulteration of the works of Origen.

The difficulties of translation.

Explanation of Origen's words “The Son does not see the Father.”

Difference between seeing and knowing.

The Translation interpolated by Eusebius of Cremona.

Eusebius, if acting honestly, should have shown me what he thought dangerous.

Jerome's method of translation was the same as mine.

Jerome's reference to his Commentary on the Ephesians.

Jerome has not really changed his mind about Origen.

Women turned into men and bodies into souls.

The foundation (καταβολή) of the world explained by Jerome as a casting down.

Jerome, under the name of “another,” gives his own views.

The fall of souls into human bodies is taught by Jerome.

Predestination.

“Another,” who gives strange views, is Jerome himself.

“Hopers” and “fore-hopers.”

Jerome has confessed these views to be his own.

Jerome has confessed these views to be his own.

Further identification of Jerome's views with Origen's.

Further identification of Jerome's views with Origen's.

The commentary on the Ephesians, selected by Jerome, is his condemnation.

Principalities and Powers.

Principalities and Powers.

Jerome's complaint of new doctrines may be retorted on himself.

Origin of men, angels, and heavenly bodies.

Origin of men, angels, and heavenly bodies.

The body as a prison.

The body as a prison.

All creatures, including the fallen angel, partaking in the final restoration.

Arrogance of Jerome's teaching.

If Origen is not to be pardoned, neither is Jerome.

Book II

Epitome of Argument.

Jerome says that the defenders of Origen are united in a federation of perjury.

Jerome's commentaries on Ephesians follow Origen's interpretation of the texts about a secret federation to whom higher truths are to be told.

But I follow Christ in condemning all falsehood.

Jerome has not only allowed perjury but has practised it.

His treatise on Virginity (Ep. xxii to Eustochium) defames all orders of Christians.

In his anti-Ciceronian dream he promised never to read or possess heathen books.

Yet his works are filled with quotations from them.

In his “Best mode of Translation” he relies on the opinions of Cicero and Horace.

He confesses his obligations to Porphyry.

Counsel

Jerome at Bethlehem had heathen books copied and taught them to boys.

He condemns as heathenish unobjectionable views which he himself holds.

He spoke of Paula impiously as the mother-in-law of God.

Such impiety is unpardonable.

Jerome's boast of his teachers, Didymus and the Jew Baranina.

His extravagant praises of Origen.

Preface to Origen on Canticles.

Preface to Commentary on Micah.

Book of Hebrew Names.

A story of Origen.

Pamphilus the Martyr and his Library.

Jerome praises Origen but condemns others for doing the same.

Jerome praises the dogmatic as well as the expository works of Origen.

Contrast of Jerome's earlier and later attitude towards Origen.

The Book of Hebrew Questions.

Jerome's attack upon Ambrose.

Preface to Didymus on the Holy Spirit.

Jerome attacks one Christian writer after another.

His treatment of Melania.

I never followed Jerome's errors, for which he should do penance.

But I followed his method of translation.

Jerome in condemning me condemns himself.

He says I shew Origen to be heretical, yet condemns me.

His pretence that the Apology for Origen is not by Pamphilus needs no answer.

Others did not translate the Περὶ ᾽Αρχῶν because they did not know Greek.

Jerome's translation of the Scriptures impugned.

Authority of the LXX.

Has the Church had spurious Scriptures?

Danger of altering the Versions of Scripture.

Origen's Hexapla--Its object.

St. Paul's method of dealing with erring brethren.

How Jerome should have replied to Pammachius.

The Books against Jovinian.

My translation of the Περὶ ᾽Αρχῶν was meant to aid in a good cause.

Recapitulation of the Apology.

Recapitulation of the Apology.

Recapitulation of the Apology.

An appeal to Pammachius.

Why my translations of Origen had created offence, but Jerome's not.

Why my translations of Origen had created offence, but Jerome's not.

A Synod, if called on to condemn Origen, must condemn Jerome also.

Jerome's Apology for Himself Against the Books of Rufinus.

Book I

Preface.

It is hard that an old friend with whom I had been reconciled should attack me in a book secretly circulated among his disciples.

Others have translated Origen. Why does he single me out?

He gave me fictitious praise in his Preface to the Περὶ ᾽Αρχῶν. Now, since I defend myself, he writes 3 books against me as an enemy.

He spoke of me as united in faith with him; but what is his faith? Why are his books kept secret? I can meet any attack.

He spoke of me as united in faith with him; but what is his faith? Why are his books kept secret? I can meet any attack.

I translated the Περὶ ᾽Αρχῶν because you demanded it, and because his translation slurred over Origen's heresies.

My translation put away ambiguities, and showed the real character of the book, and of the previous translation.

My translation of Origen's Commentaries created no excitement; his first translation, of Pamphilus' Apology, roused all Rome to indignation.

But the work was really Eusebius's, who tells us that Pamphilus wrote nothing.

After the condemnation of Origen by Theophilus and Anastasius, it would be wise in Rufinus to give up this pretended defence.

I had praised Eusebius as well as Origen only as writers; and was forced to condemn them as heretics. Why should this be taken amiss?

I wrote a friendly letter to Rufinus, which my friends kept back.

There is nothing to blame in my getting the help of a Jew in translating from the Hebrew.

There is nothing strange in my praising Origen before I knew the Περὶ ᾽Αρχῶν.

The accusations seem inconsistent, but I knew them only by report.

The office of a commentator.

We must distinguish methods of writing, and not expect a vulgar simplicity in the various compositions of cultured men.

My assertion was true, that Origen permitted the use of falsehood.

The accusation about a mistranslation of Ps. ii is easily explained.

In the difficulties of the translator and the commentator we must get help where we can.

In the Commentary on Ephesians I acted straightforwardly in giving the views of Origen and others.

As to the passage “He hath chosen us before the foundation of the world.”

As to the passage “Far above all rule and authority &c.”

As to the passage “That in the ages to come &c.“

As to “Paul the prisoner of Jesus Christ.”

As to “The body fitly framed &c.”

I quoted Origen's views as, “According to another heresy.”

As to “Men loving their wives as their own bodies.”

As to “Men loving their wives as their own bodies.”

To the charge of reading secular books I reply that I remember what I learned in youth.

Also, a promise given in a dream must not be pressed. Why should such things be raked up by old friends against one another?

I am right in my contention that all sins are remitted in baptism.

Book II

Summary of the Chapters.

A criticism on Rufinus' Apology to Anastasius. His excuses for not coming to Rome are absurd. His parents are dead and the journey is easy. No one ever heard before of his being imprisoned or exiled for the faith.

A criticism on Rufinus' Apology to Anastasius. His excuses for not coming to Rome are absurd. His parents are dead and the journey is easy. No one ever heard before of his being imprisoned or exiled for the faith.

A criticism on Rufinus' Apology to Anastasius. His excuses for not coming to Rome are absurd. His parents are dead and the journey is easy. No one ever heard before of his being imprisoned or exiled for the faith.

His confession of faith is unsatisfactory. No one asked him about the Trinity, but about Origen's doctrines of the Resurrection, the origin of souls, and the salvability of Satan. As to the Resurrection and to Satan he is ambiguous. As to souls he professes ignorance.

His confession of faith is unsatisfactory. No one asked him about the Trinity, but about Origen's doctrines of the Resurrection, the origin of souls, and the salvability of Satan. As to the Resurrection and to Satan he is ambiguous. As to souls he professes ignorance.

His confession of faith is unsatisfactory. No one asked him about the Trinity, but about Origen's doctrines of the Resurrection, the origin of souls, and the salvability of Satan. As to the Resurrection and to Satan he is ambiguous. As to souls he professes ignorance.

His confession of faith is unsatisfactory. No one asked him about the Trinity, but about Origen's doctrines of the Resurrection, the origin of souls, and the salvability of Satan. As to the Resurrection and to Satan he is ambiguous. As to souls he professes ignorance.

His confession of faith is unsatisfactory. No one asked him about the Trinity, but about Origen's doctrines of the Resurrection, the origin of souls, and the salvability of Satan. As to the Resurrection and to Satan he is ambiguous. As to souls he professes ignorance.

What Latin! The poor souls must be tormented by his barbarisms.

It is not permitted to you to be ignorant of such a matter which all the churches know.

As to translating the Περὶ ᾽Αρχῶν, it is not a question, but a charge that you unjustifiably altered the book.

Origen asserts Christ to be a creature, and maintains universal restitution. Where has he contradicted this?

Origen asserts Christ to be a creature, and maintains universal restitution. Where has he contradicted this?

The question is, as Anastasius says to John of Jerusalem, with what motive you translated the Περὶ ᾽Αρχῶν.

You pretend not to be Origen's defender, but you publish and enlarge the Apology for him and allege the heretics' falsification of his works.

Your defence gains no support from Eusebius or Didymus, who, each for his own reason, defend the Περὶ ᾽Αρχῶν as it stands.

If we may allege falsification at every turn we make a chaos of all past literature.

The object of Origen's letter, of which he translates only a part, is not to shew the falsification of his writings but to vituperate the Bishops who condemned him.

It is only in reference to a particular point in his dispute with Candidus that Origen alleges this falsification. The story of Hilary's being condemned through his writings having been falsified has no foundation.

That which you tell about myself in Damasus' council is mere after-dinner gossip.

The attack on Epiphanius as a plagiarist of Origen is an outrage on the Bishops generally. Origen never wrote 6000 books.

The attack on Epiphanius as a plagiarist of Origen is an outrage on the Bishops generally. Origen never wrote 6000 books.

I ascertained at the library at Cæsarea that the Apology you quote as Pamphilus' is the work of Eusebius.

The letter falsely circulated in Africa as mine, and expressing regret for my translation of the Old Test. from the Hebrew bears the mark of your hand. I have always honoured the Seventy Translators.

In proof of this, I bring forward the prefaces to my Translation of the Books from Genesis to Isaiah.

As to Daniel, it was necessary to point out that Bel and the Dragon, and similar stories were not found in the Hebrew.

A vindication of the importance of the Hebrew Text of Scripture.

Though the LXX has been of great value, we should be grateful for fresh translations from the original.

Book III

Preface.

Your letter is full of falsehood and violence. I will try not to take the same tone.

Why cannot we differ as friends? Why do you, by threats of death, compel me to answer?

Your shameful taunt that I wished to get copies of your Apology by bribing your Secretary is an imputation to me of practices which are your own.

Your shameful taunt that I wished to get copies of your Apology by bribing your Secretary is an imputation to me of practices which are your own.

Eusebius should not have accused you; but your charges against him will not stand.

You taunt me with boasting of my eloquence. Will you boast of your illiteracy?

You wish first to praise, then to amend me, but both with fisticuffs; and make it impossible for me to keep silence.

You wish first to praise, then to amend me, but both with fisticuffs; and make it impossible for me to keep silence.

Why cannot you join with me in condemning Origen, and so put an end to our quarrel?

The assertion that you had only two days for your answer is a fiction.

Your translation, contrariwise to my Commentaries, vouches for the soundness of Origen.

You try to shield Origen by falsely attributing the Apology for him to Pamphilus.

In my Commentaries my quotation of opposite opinions shows that neither is mine.

Had you translated honestly, you would not have had Origen's heresies imputed to you.

You say the Bishops of Italy accept your views on the Resurrection. I doubt it.

You rashly say that you will agree to whatever Theophilus lays down. You have to consider your friendship for Isidore now his enemy.

You speak of the Egyptian Bishop Paul. We received him, though an Origenist, as a stranger; and he has united himself to the orthodox faith. Not only Theophilus but the Emperors condemn Origen.

You speak of the Egyptian Bishop Paul. We received him, though an Origenist, as a stranger; and he has united himself to the orthodox faith. Not only Theophilus but the Emperors condemn Origen.

Against Vigilantius I wrote only what was right. I knew who had stirred him up against me.

As to the letter of Pope Anastasius condemning you, you will find that it is genuine.

Siricius who is dead may have written in your favour; Anastasius who is living writes to the East against you.

My departure from Rome for the East had nothing blameable in it as you insinuate.

Epiphanius, it is true, gave you the kiss of peace; but he showed afterwards that he had come to distrust you.

When we parted as friends I believed you a true believer; no one was sent to Rome to injure you.

You swear that you did not write my pretended retractation. Your style betrays you, and I have given a full answer about my translations already.

You bid me beware of falsification and treachery. You warn me against yourself.

There is nothing inconsistent in praising a man for some things and blaming him in others. You have done it in my case.

My ignorance of many natural phenomena is no excuse for your ignorance as to the origin of souls. You ought, according to your boasting dream to know everything. The thing of most importance was forgotten in your cargo of Eastern wares.

My ignorance of many natural phenomena is no excuse for your ignorance as to the origin of souls. You ought, according to your boasting dream to know everything. The thing of most importance was forgotten in your cargo of Eastern wares.

My ignorance of many natural phenomena is no excuse for your ignorance as to the origin of souls. You ought, according to your boasting dream to know everything. The thing of most importance was forgotten in your cargo of Eastern wares.

My ignorance of many natural phenomena is no excuse for your ignorance as to the origin of souls. You ought, according to your boasting dream to know everything. The thing of most importance was forgotten in your cargo of Eastern wares.

Your dream was a boast: mine of which you accuse me humbled me.

It was not I who first disclosed your heresies, but Epiphanius long ago and Aterbius before him.

As to our translations of the Περὶ ᾽Αρχῶν, yours was doing harm, and mine was necessary in self-defence. You should be glad that heresy is exposed.

As to our translations of the Περὶ ᾽Αρχῶν, yours was doing harm, and mine was necessary in self-defence. You should be glad that heresy is exposed.

As to our translations of the Περὶ ᾽Αρχῶν, yours was doing harm, and mine was necessary in self-defence. You should be glad that heresy is exposed.

Your Apology for Origen did not save him but involved you in heresy.

My friendly letter was to prevent discord: the other to crush false opinions.

Pythagoras was rightly quoted by me. I produce some of his sayings.

Pythagoras was rightly quoted by me. I produce some of his sayings.

You threaten me with destruction. I will not reply in the same way. Personalities should be excluded from controversies of faith.

You threaten me with destruction. I will not reply in the same way. Personalities should be excluded from controversies of faith.

The way of peace is through the wisdom taught in the Book of Proverbs, and through unity in the faith.

The way of peace is through the wisdom taught in the Book of Proverbs, and through unity in the faith.

A Commentary on the Apostles' Creed.

The Preface to the Books of Recognitions of St. Clement.

Preface to the Translation of the Sayings of Xystus.

Preface to the Two Books of Ecclesiastical History, Added by Rufinus to His Translation of Eusebius.

Rufinus' Preface to the Translation of Origen's Commentary on Psalms 36, 37, and 38.

Rufinus' Preface to the Translation of Origen's Commentary on the Epistle to the Romans.

The Peroration of Rufinus Appended to His Translation of Origen's Commentary on the Epistle to the Romans.

Preface to Origen's Homilies on Numbers.

Indexes


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