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ANF08. The Twelve Patriarchs, Excerpts and Epistles, The Clementia, Apocrypha, Decretals, Memoirs of Edessa and Syriac Documents, Remains of the First
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Chapter XXIV.—Allegory.

When Appion heard this, he said:  “I knew, ever since I heard that you were consorting with Jews, that you had alienated your judgment.  For it has been well said by some one, ‘Evil communications corrupt good manners.’”  Then said I:  “Therefore good communications correct evil manners.”  And Appion said:  “Today I am fully satisfied to have learned your position; therefore I permitted you to speak first.  But to-morrow, in this place, if it is agreeable to you, I will show, in the presence of these friends when they meet, that our gods are neither adulterers, nor murderers, nor corrupters of children, nor guilty of incest with sisters or daughters.  But the ancients, wishing that only lovers of learning should know the mysteries, veiled them with those fables of which you have spoken.  For they speak physiologically of boiling substance under the name of Zen, and of time under that of Kronos, and of the ever-flowing nature of water under that of Rhea.  However, as I have promised, I shall to-morrow exhibit the truth of things, explaining them one by one to you when you come together in the morning.”10441044    [See Homily VI. 1–10.  Homily V. contains an account of Clement’s previous acquaintance with Appion.—R.]  In reply to this I said:  “To-morrow, as you have promised, so do.  But now hear something in opposition to what you are going to say.


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