aA
aA
aA
ANF05. Fathers of the Third Century: Hippolytus, Cyprian, Caius, Novatian, Appendix
« Prev Origin of the Greek Philosophy. Next »

Chapter XVII.—Origin of the Greek Philosophy.

The origin, then, from which Plato derived his theory in the Timæus, is (the) wisdom of the Egyptians.651651    See Timæus, c. vii. ed. Bekker. For from this source, by some ancient and prophetical tradition, Solon652652    Or, “Solomon,” evidently a mistake. taught his entire system concerning the generation and destruction of the world, as Plato says, to the Greeks, who were (in knowledge) young children, and were acquainted with no theological doctrine of greater antiquity. In order, therefore, that we may trace accurately the arguments by which Valentinus established his tenets, I shall now explain what are the principles of the philosophy of Pythagoras of Samos,—a philosophy (coupled) with that Silence so celebrated by the Greeks. And next in this manner (I shall elucidate) those (opinions) which Valentinus derives from Pythagoras and Plato, but refers with all solemnity of speech to Christ, and before Christ to the Father of the universe, and to Silence conjoined with the Father.


« Prev Origin of the Greek Philosophy. Next »

Advertisements


| Define | Popups: Login | Register | Prev Next | Help |