aA
aA
aA
aA
aA
aA
ANF04. Fathers of the Third Century: Tertullian, Part Fourth; Minucius Felix; Commodian; Origen, Parts First and Second
« Prev Chapter XCIX Next »

Chapter XCIX.

In addition to all that he has already said, Celsus subjoins the following:  “All things, accordingly, were not made for man, any more than they were made for lions, or eagles, or dolphins, but that this world, as being God’s work, might be perfect and entire in all respects.  For this reason all things have been adjusted, not with reference to each other, but with regard to their bearing upon the whole.40674067    ἀλλ᾽ εἰ μὴ πᾶν ἔργον.  “Gelenius does not recognise these words, and Guietus regards them as superfluous.”  They are omitted in the translation.  And God takes care of the whole, and (His) providence will never forsake it; and it does not become worse; nor does God after a time bring it back to himself; nor is He angry on account of men any more than on account of apes or flies; nor does He threaten these beings, each one of which has received its appointed lot in its proper place.”  Let us then briefly reply to these statements.  I think, indeed, that I have shown in the preceding pages that all things were created for man, and every rational being, and that it was chiefly for the sake of the rational creature that the creation took place.  Celsus, indeed, may say that this was done not more for man than for lions, or the other creatures which he mentions; but we maintain that the Creator did not form these things for lions, or eagles, or dolphins, but all for the sake of the rational creature, and “in order that this world, as being God’s work, might be perfect and complete in all things.”  For to this sentiment we must yield our assent as being well said.  And God takes care, not, as Celsus supposes, merely of the whole, but beyond the whole, in a special degree of every rational being.  Nor will Providence ever abandon the whole; for although it should become more wicked, owing to the sin of the rational being, which is a portion of the whole, He makes arrangements to purify it, and after a time to bring back the whole to Himself.  Moreover, He is not angry with apes or flies; but on human beings, as those who have transgressed the laws of nature, He sends judgments and chastisements, and threatens them by the mouth of the prophets, and by the Saviour who came to visit the whole human race, that those who hear the threatenings may be converted by them, while those who neglect these calls to conversion may deservedly suffer those punishments which it becomes God, in conformity with that will of His which acts for the advantage of the whole, to inflict upon those who need such painful discipline and correction.  But as our fourth book has now attained sufficient dimensions, we shall here terminate our discourse.  And may God grant, through His Son, who is God the Word, and Wisdom, and Truth, and Righteousness, and everything else which the sacred Scriptures when speaking of God call Him, that we may make a good beginning of the fifth book, to the benefit of our readers, and may bring it to a successful conclusion, with the aid of His word abiding in our soul.


« Prev Chapter XCIX Next »

Advertisements


| Define | Popups: Login | Register | Prev Next | Help |