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ANF04. Fathers of the Third Century: Tertullian, Part Fourth; Minucius Felix; Commodian; Origen, Parts First and Second
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XI.—Apollo the Soothsaying and False.

Ye make Apollo a player on the cithara, and divine.  Born at first of Maia, in the isle of Delos, subsequently, for offered wages, a builder, obeying the king Laomedon, he reared the walls of the Trojans.  And he established himself, and ye are seduced into thinking him a god, in whose bones the love of Cassandra burned, whom the virgin craftily sported with, and, though a divine being, he is deceived.  By his office of augur he was able to know the double-hearted one.  Moreover rejected, he, though divine, departed thence.  Him the virgin burnt up with her beauty, whom he ought to have burnt up; while she ought first of all to have loved the god who thus lustfully began to love Daphne, and still follows her up, wishing to violate the maid.  The fool loves in vain.  Nor can he obtain her by running.  Surely, if he were a god, he would come up with her through the air.  She first came under the roof, and the divine being remained outside.  The race of men deceive you, for they were of a sad way of life.  Moreover, he is said to have fed the cattle of Admetus.  While in imposed sports he threw the quoit into the air, he could not restrain it as it fell, and it killed his friend.  That was the last day of his companion Hyacinthus.  Had he been divine, he would have foreknown the death of his friend.

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