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De Servo Arbitrio “On the Enslaved Will” or The Bondage of Will
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Sect. CLXI – AGAIN, the Baptist saith, “A man can receive nothing, except it were given him from above.” (John iii. 27).

Let not the Diatribe here produce its forces, where it enumerates all those things which we have from heaven. We are now disputing, not about nature, but about grace: we are inquiring, not what we are upon earth, but what we are in heaven before God. We know that man was constituted lord over those things which are beneath himself; over which, he has a right and a Free-will, that those things might do, and obey as he wills and thinks. But we are now inquiring whether he has a “Free-will” over God, that He should do and obey in those things which man wills: or rather, whether God has not a Free-will over man, that he should will and do what God wills, and should be able to do nothing but what He wills and does. The Baptist here says, that he “can receive nothing, except it be given him from above.” — Wherefore, “Free-will” must be a nothing at all!

Again, “He that is of the earth, is earthly and speaketh of the earth, He that cometh from heaven is above all.” (John iii. 31).

Here again, he makes all those earthly, who are not of Christ, and says that they savour and speak of earthly things only, nor does he leave any medium characters. But surely, “Free-will” is not “He that cometh from heaven.” Wherefore it must of necessity, be “he that is of the earth,” and that speaks of the earth and savours of the earth. But if there were any power in man, which at any time, in any place, or by any work, did not savour of the earth, the Baptist ought to have excepted this person, and not to have said in a general way concerning all those who are out of Christ, that they are of the earth, and speak of the earth.

So also afterwards, Christ saith, “Ye are of the world, I am not of the world. Ye are from beneath, I am from above.” (John viii. 23).

And yet, those to whom He spoke had “Free-will,” that is, reason and will; but still He says, that they are “of the world.” But what news would He have told, if He had merely said, that they were of the world, as to their ‘grosser affections?’ Did not the whole world know this before? Moreover, what need was there for His saying that men were of the world, as to that part in which they are brutal? For according to that, beasts are also of the world.

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