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De Servo Arbitrio “On the Enslaved Will” or The Bondage of Will
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Sect. CLIV. — BUT however, before we hear the Evangelist John, I will just add the crowning testimony from Paul: and I am prepared, if this be not sufficient, to oppose Paul to “Free-will” by commenting upon him throughout. Where he divides the human race into two distinctive divisions, “flesh” and “spirit,” he speaks thus — “They that are after the flesh, do mind the things of the flesh; but they that are after the Spirit, do mind the things of the Spirit,” (Rom. viii. 5). As Christ also does, “That which is born of the flesh is flesh; and that which is born of the Spirit is spirit,” (John iii 6).

That Paul here calls all carnal who are not spiritual, is manifest, both from the division itself and the opposition of spirit to flesh, and from the very words of Paul himself, where he adds, “But ye are not in the flesh but in the Spirit, if so be that the Spirit of God dwell in you. Now if any man have not the Spirit of Christ he is none of His” (Rom. viii. 9). What else is the meaning of “But ye are not in the flesh, but in the Spirit, if so be that the Spirit of Christ dwell in you,” but, that those who have not the “Spirit,” are, necessarily, in the “flesh?” And if any man be not of Christ, what else is he but of Satan? It is manifest, therefore, that those who are devoid of the Spirit, are “in the flesh,” and under Satan.

Now let us see what his opinion is concerning the endeavour and the power of “Free-will” in the carnal, who are in the flesh. “They cannot please God.” Again, “The carnal mind is death.” Again, “The carnal mind is enmity against God,” And again, “It is not subject to the law of God neither indeed can be.” (Rom. viii. 5-8). Here let the advocate for “Free-will” answer me — How can that endeavour toward good “which is death,” which “cannot please God,” which “is enmity against God,” which “is not subject to God,” and “cannot” be subject to him? Nor does Paul mean to say, that the carnal mind is dead and inimical to God; but that, it is death itself, enmity itself which cannot possibly be subject to the law of God or please God, as he had said just before, “For what the law could not do, in that it was weak through the flesh, God did,” &c. (Rom. viii. 3).

But I am very well acquainted with that fable of Origen concerning the three-fold affection; the one of which he calls ‘flesh,’ the other ‘soul,’ and the other ‘spirit,’ making the soul that medium affection, vertible either way, towards the flesh or towards the spirit. But these are merely his own dreams; he speaks them forth only, but does not prove them. Paul here calls every thing “flesh” that is without the “Spirit,” as I have already shewn. Therefore, those most exalted virtues of the best men are in the flesh; that is, they are dead, and at enmity against God; they are not subject to the law of God, nor indeed can be; and they please not God. For Paul does not only say that such men are not subject, but that they cannot be subject. So also Christ saith, “An evil tree cannot bring forth good fruit.” (Matt. vii. 17). And again, “How can ye being evil speak that which is good,” (Matt. xii. 34). Here you see, we not only speak that which is evil, but cannot speak that which is good.

And though He saith in another place, that we who are evil know how to give good gifts unto our children, (Matt. vi. 11), yet He denies that we do good, even when we give good gifts; because those good gifts which we give are the creatures of God; but we ourselves not being good, cannot give those good gifts well. For He is speaking unto all men; nay, even unto His own disciples. So that these two sentiments of Paul, that the just man liveth “by faith,” (Rom. i. 17), and that “whatsoever is not of faith is sin,” (Rom. xiv. 23), stand confirmed: the latter of which follows from the former. For if there be nothing by which we are justified but faith only, it is evident that those who are not of faith, are not justified. And if they be not justified, they are sinners. And if they be sinners, they are evil trees and can do nothing but sin and bring forth evil fruit — Wherefore, “Free-will” is nothing but the servant of sin, of death, and of Satan, doing nothing, and being able to do or attempt nothing, but evil!

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