John Calvin

French reformer and theologian

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John Calvin was an influential French theologian and pastor during the Protestant Reformation. He was a principal figure in the development of the system of Christian theology later called Calvinism. Originally trained as a humanist lawyer, he broke from the Roman Catholic Church around 1530.

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July 10, 1509
Francio
May 27, 1564
Geneva
Biography, Calvinism, Commentaries, Early works, History
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Biography

 John Calvin
Source: Wikipedia

Born July 10, 1509 in Noyon, France, Jean Calvin was raised in a staunch Roman Catholic family. The local bishop employed Calvin's father as an administrator in the town's cathedral. The father, in turn, wanted John to become a priest. Because of close ties with the bishop and his noble family, John's playmates and classmates in Noyon (and later in Paris) were aristocratic and culturally influential in his early life.

At the age of 14 Calvin went to Paris to study at the College de Marche in preparation for university study. His studies consisted of seven subjects: grammar, rhetoric, logic, arithmetic, geometry, astronomy, and music. Toward the end of 1523 Calvin transferred to the more famous College Montaigu. While in Paris he changed his name to its Latin form, Ioannis Calvinus, which in French became Jean Calvin. During this time, Calvin's education was paid for in part by income from a couple of small parishes. So although the new theological teachings of individuals like Luther and Jacques Lefevre d'Etaples were spreading throughout Paris, Calvin was closely tied to the Roman Church. However, by 1527 Calvin had developed friendships with individuals who were reform-minded. These contacts set the stage for Calvin's eventual switch to the Reformed faith. Also, at this time Calvin's father advised him to study law rather than theology.

By 1528 Calvin moved to Orleans to study civil law. The following years found Calvin studying in various places and under various scholars, as he received a humanist education. By 1532 Calvin finished his law studies and also published his first book, a commentary on De Clementia by the Roman philosopher, Seneca. The following year Calvin fled Paris because of contacts with individuals who through lectures and writings opposed the Roman Catholic Church. It is thought that in 1533 Calvin experienced the sudden and unexpected conversion that he writes about in his foreword to his commentary on the Psalms.

For the next three years, Calvin lived in various places outside of France under various names. He studied on his own, preached, and began work on his first edition of the Institutes of the Christian Religion, an instant best seller. By 1536 Calvin had disengaged himself from the Roman Catholic Church and made plans to permanently leave France and go to Strasbourg. However, war had broken out between Francis I and Charles V, so Calvin decided to make a one-night detour to Geneva.

But Calvin's fame in Geneva preceded him. Farel, a local reformer, invited him to stay in Geneva and threatened him with God's anger if he did not. Thus began a long, difficult, yet ultimately fruitful relationship with that city. He began as a lecturer and preacher, but by 1538 was asked to leave because of theological conflicts. He went to Strasbourg until 1541. His stay there as a pastor to French refugees was so peaceful and happy that when in 1541 the Council of Geneva requested that he return to Geneva, he was emotionally torn. He wanted to stay in Strasbourg but felt a responsibility to return to Geneva. He did so and remained in Geneva until his death May 27, 1564. Those years were filled with lecturing, preaching, and the writing of commentaries, treatises, and various editions of the Institutes of the Christian Religion.

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Works by John Calvin

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82 editions published.

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64 editions published.

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Calvin's Commentaries, complete.

Selections from Calvin's Commentaries, newly translated, and arranged by subject.

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51 editions published.

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This book contains John Calvin's excellent commentary on James, First and Second Peter, First John, and Jude. Regarded as one of the Reformation's best interpreters of scripture, Calvin is an apt commentator. In particular, he frequently offers his own translations of a passage, explaining the subtleties and nuances of his translation. He has a penchant for incorporating keen pastoral insight into the text as well. He always interacts with other theologians, commentators, and portions of the Bible when interpreting a particular passage. Further, this volume also contains extensive, informative notes from the editor. After 400 years, Calvin's Commentary on the Catholic Epistles remains instructive, engaging, and lively.

Commentary on Acts is an impressive commentary, containing some of Calvin's most important views. Calvin is regarded as one of the Reformation's best interpreters of scripture. He frequently offers his own translations of a passage, explaining the subtleties and nuances of his translation. He has a penchant for incorporating keen pastoral insight into the text as well. He always interacts with other theologians, commentators, and portions of the Bible when interpreting a particular passage. Further, this volume also contains informative notes from the editor. Calvin's Commentary on Acts should not be ignored by anyone interested in the book of Acts or Calvin himself.

Commentary on Acts is an impressive commentary, containing some of Calvin's most important views. Calvin is regarded as one of the Reformation's best interpreters of scripture. He frequently offers his own translations of a passage, explaining the subtleties and nuances of his translation. He has a penchant for incorporating keen pastoral insight into the text as well. He always interacts with other theologians, commentators, and portions of the Bible when interpreting a particular passage. Further, this volume also contains informative notes from the editor. Calvin's Commentary on Acts should not be ignored by anyone interested in the book of Acts or Calvin himself.

Commentary on Corinthians is an impressive commentary. Calvin is regarded as one of the Reformation's best interpreters of scripture. He frequently offers his own translations of a passage, explaining the subtleties and nuances of his translation. He has a penchant for incorporating keen pastoral insight into the text as well. He always interacts with other theologians, commentators, and portions of the Bible when interpreting a particular passage. Further, this volume also contains informative notes from the editor. Calvin's Commentary on Corinthians should not be ignored by anyone interested in the books of Corinthians or John Calvin himself.

Commentary on Corinthians is an impressive commentary. Calvin is regarded as one of the Reformation's best interpreters of scripture. He frequently offers his own translations of a passage, explaining the subtleties and nuances of his translation. He has a penchant for incorporating keen pastoral insight into the text as well. He always interacts with other theologians, commentators, and portions of the Bible when interpreting a particular passage. Further, this volume also contains informative notes from the editor. Calvin's Commentary on Corinthians should not be ignored by anyone interested in the books of Corinthians or John Calvin himself.

In this volume, John Calvin provides an engaging commentary on the first 6 chapters of Daniel. Regarded as one of the Reformation's best interpreters of scripture, Calvin is an apt commentator. In particular, he frequently offers his own translations of a passage, explaining the subtleties and nuances of his translation. He has a penchant for incorporating keen pastoral insight into the text as well. He always interacts with other theologians, commentators, and portions of the Bible when interpreting a particular passage. This volume also contains extensive, informative notes from the editor. Calvin's Commentary on Daniel should not be ignored.

In this volume, John Calvin provides an engaging commentary on the last 6 chapters of Daniel. Regarded as one of the Reformation's best interpreters of scripture, Calvin is an apt commentator. In particular, he frequently offers his own translations of a passage, explaining the subtleties and nuances of his translation. He has a penchant for incorporating keen pastoral insight into the text as well. He always interacts with other theologians, commentators, and portions of the Bible when interpreting a particular passage. This volume also contains extensive, informative notes from the editor. Calvin's Commentary on Daniel should not be ignored.

In this volume, John Calvin provides an engaging commentary on the first 12 chapters of Ezekiel. Regarded as one of the Reformation's best interpreters of scripture, Calvin is an apt commentator. In particular, he frequently offers his own translations of a passage, explaining the subtleties and nuances of his translation. He has a penchant for incorporating keen pastoral insight into the text as well. He always interacts with other theologians, commentators, and portions of the Bible when interpreting a particular passage. This volume also contains extensive, informative notes from the editor. Calvin's Commentary on Ezekiel should not be ignored.

In this volume, John Calvin provides an engaging commentary on the last 8 chapters of Ezekiel. Regarded as one of the Reformation's best interpreters of scripture, Calvin is an apt commentator. In particular, he frequently offers his own translations of a passage, explaining the subtleties and nuances of his translation. He has a penchant for incorporating keen pastoral insight into the text as well. He always interacts with other theologians, commentators, and portions of the Bible when interpreting a particular passage. This volume also contains extensive, informative notes from the editor. Calvin's Commentary on Ezekiel should not be ignored.

Commentary on Galatians and Ephesians is an impressive commentary. Calvin is regarded as one of the Reformation's best interpreters of scripture. He frequently offers his own translations of a passage, explaining the subtleties and nuances of his translation. He has a penchant for incorporating keen pastoral insight into the text as well. He always interacts with other theologians, commentators, and portions of the Bible when interpreting a particular passage. Further, this volume also contains informative notes from the editor. Calvin's Commentary on Galatians and Ephesians should not be ignored by anyone interested in those books or John Calvin himself.

In this volume, John Calvin provides an engaging commentary on the first 23 chapters of Genesis. Regarded as one of the Reformation's best interpreters of scripture, Calvin is an apt commentator. In particular, he frequently offers his own translations of a passage, explaining the subtleties and nuances of his translation. He has a penchant for incorporating keen pastoral insight into the text as well. He always interacts with other theologians, commentators, and portions of the Bible when interpreting a particular passage. Further, this volume also contains extensive, informative notes from the editor. After 400 years, Calvin's Commentary on Genesis remains instructive, engaging, and lively. It should not be ignored.

In this volume, John Calvin provides an engaging commentary on chapters 24 through 50 of Genesis. Regarded as one of the Reformation's best interpreters of scripture, Calvin is an apt commentator. In particular, he frequently offers his own translations of a passage, explaining the subtleties and nuances of his translation. He has a penchant for incorporating keen pastoral insight into the text as well. He always interacts with other theologians, commentators, and portions of the Bible when interpreting a particular passage. Further, this volume also contains extensive, informative notes from the editor. After 400 years, Calvin's Commentary on Genesis remains instructive, engaging, and lively. It should not be ignored.

In this small volume, John Calvin provides an interesting commentary on the books of Habakkuk, Zephaniah, and Haggai. Regarded as one of the Reformation's best interpreters of scripture, Calvin is an apt commentator. In particular, he frequently offers his own translations of a passage, explaining the subtleties and nuances of his translation. He has a penchant for incorporating keen pastoral insight into the text as well. He always interacts with other theologians, commentators, and portions of the Bible when interpreting a particular passage. Calvin's Commentary on Habakkuk, Zephaniah, and Haggai is instructive and practical. It will prove useful to theologians and laypeople alike.

Commentary on Hebrews
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In this volume, John Calvin provides an engaging commentary on the book of Hebrews. Calvin is an apt commentator, one of the Reformation's best. He always interacts with other theologians, commentators, and portions of the Bible when interpreting a particular passage. He frequently offers his own translations of a passage, explaining the subtleties and nuances of his translation as well. He has a penchant for incorporating keen pastoral insight into the text. This volume also contains extensive, informative notes from the editor. Despite many years, many readers have found Calvin's Commentary on Hebrews both instructive and interesting.

Commentary on Hosea
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In this volume, John Calvin provides a fascinating commentary on the book of Hosea. Regarded as one of the Reformation's best interpreters of scripture, Calvin is an apt commentator. In particular, he frequently offers his own translations of a passage, explaining the subtleties and nuances of his translation. He has a penchant for incorporating keen pastoral insight into the text as well. He always interacts with other theologians, commentators, and portions of the Bible when interpreting a particular passage. Calvin's Commentary on Hosea is insightful and useful.

In this volume, John Calvin provides an engaging commentary on the book of Isaiah. Like many Reformed commentators, Calvin takes an allegorical interpretation of many passages. Always an apt commentator, Calvin frequently offers his own translations of a passage, explaining the subtleties and nuances of his translation. He has a penchant for incorporating keen pastoral insight into the text as well. He always interacts with other theologians, commentators, and portions of the Bible when interpreting a particular passage. Calvin's Commentary on Isaiah remains instructive, engaging, and lively.

In this volume, John Calvin provides an engaging commentary on the book of Isaiah. Like many Reformed commentators, Calvin takes an allegorical interpretation of many passages. Always an apt commentator, Calvin frequently offers his own translations of a passage, explaining the subtleties and nuances of his translation. He has a penchant for incorporating keen pastoral insight into the text as well. He always interacts with other theologians, commentators, and portions of the Bible when interpreting a particular passage. Calvin's Commentary on Isaiah remains instructive, engaging, and lively.

In this volume, John Calvin provides an engaging commentary on the book of Isaiah. Like many Reformed commentators, Calvin takes an allegorical interpretation of many passages. Always an apt commentator, Calvin frequently offers his own translations of a passage, explaining the subtleties and nuances of his translation. He has a penchant for incorporating keen pastoral insight into the text as well. He always interacts with other theologians, commentators, and portions of the Bible when interpreting a particular passage. Calvin's Commentary on Isaiah remains instructive, engaging, and lively.

In this volume, John Calvin provides an engaging commentary on the book of Isaiah. Like many Reformed commentators, Calvin takes an allegorical interpretation of many passages. Always an apt commentator, Calvin frequently offers his own translations of a passage, explaining the subtleties and nuances of his translation. He has a penchant for incorporating keen pastoral insight into the text as well. He always interacts with other theologians, commentators, and portions of the Bible when interpreting a particular passage. Calvin's Commentary on Isaiah remains instructive, engaging, and lively.

In this volume, John Calvin provides an engaging commentary on the book of Jeremiah and Lamentations. Originally given as a series of lectures, Calvin's commentary is useful both for intellectual study and spiritual growth. Throughout, Calvin incorporates his keen pastoral insight. Utilizing other theologians and passages, Calvin attempts to provide new and fresh insights for readers. A commentary which has truly lasted the test of time, Calvin's Commentary on Jeremiah and Lamentations is insightful, interesting, and profitable for study.

In this volume, John Calvin provides an engaging commentary on the book of Jeremiah and Lamentations. Originally given as a series of lectures, Calvin's commentary is useful both for intellectual study and spiritual growth. Throughout, Calvin incorporates his keen pastoral insight. Utilizing other theologians and passages, Calvin attempts to provide new and fresh insights for readers. A commentary which has truly lasted the test of time, Calvin's Commentary on Jeremiah and Lamentations is insightful, interesting, and profitable for study.

In this volume, John Calvin provides an engaging commentary on the book of Jeremiah and Lamentations. Originally given as a series of lectures, Calvin's commentary is useful both for intellectual study and spiritual growth. Throughout, Calvin incorporates his keen pastoral insight. Utilizing other theologians and passages, Calvin attempts to provide new and fresh insights for readers. A commentary which has truly lasted the test of time, Calvin's Commentary on Jeremiah and Lamentations is insightful, interesting, and profitable for study.

In this volume, John Calvin provides an engaging commentary on the book of Jeremiah and Lamentations. Originally given as a series of lectures, Calvin's commentary is useful both for intellectual study and spiritual growth. Throughout, Calvin incorporates his keen pastoral insight. Utilizing other theologians and passages, Calvin attempts to provide new and fresh insights for readers. A commentary which has truly lasted the test of time, Calvin's Commentary on Jeremiah and Lamentations is insightful, interesting, and profitable for study.

In this volume, John Calvin provides an engaging commentary on the book of Jeremiah and Lamentations. Originally given as a series of lectures, Calvin's commentary is useful both for intellectual study and spiritual growth. Throughout, Calvin incorporates his keen pastoral insight. Utilizing other theologians and passages, Calvin attempts to provide new and fresh insight for readers. A commentary which has truly lasted the test of time, Calvin's Commentary on Jeremiah and Lamentations is insightful, interesting, and profitable for study.

In this book, John Calvin provides an engaging commentary on three Minor Prophets in the Old Testament: Joel, Amos, and Obadiah. Calvin begins his commentary on each book with a short introduction. When commenting on a book, he frequently offers his own translations of a passage, explaining the subtleties and nuances of his translation. His treatment of the text reveals his keen pastoral insights. And as always, he interacts with other theologians, commentators, and portions of the Bible when interpreting a particular passage. After several hundred years, Calvin's Commentary on Joel, Amos, and Obadiah remains an instructive and interesting commentary to several Old Testament books.

Commentary on John is an impressive commentary, containing some of Calvin's most important views. Calvin is regarded as one of the Reformation's best interpreters of scripture. He frequently offers his own translations of a passage, explaining the subtleties and nuances of his translation. He has a penchant for incorporating keen pastoral insight into the text as well. He always interacts with other theologians, commentators, and portions of the Bible when interpreting a particular passage. Further, this volume also contains informative notes from the editor. Calvin's Commentary on John should not be ignored by anyone interested in the book of John or Calvin himself.

Commentary on John is an impressive commentary, containing some of Calvin's most important views. Calvin is regarded as one of the Reformation's best interpreters of scripture. He frequently offers his own translations of a passage, explaining the subtleties and nuances of his translation. He has a penchant for incorporating keen pastoral insight into the text as well. He always interacts with other theologians, commentators, and portions of the Bible when interpreting a particular passage. Further, this volume also contains informative notes from the editor. Calvin's Commentary on John should not be ignored by anyone interested in the book of John or Calvin himself.

In this small volume, John Calvin provides an interesting commentary on the books of Jonah, Micah, and Nahum. Regarded as one of the Reformation's best interpreters of scripture, Calvin is an apt commentator. In particular, he frequently offers his own translations of a passage, explaining the subtleties and nuances of his translation. He has a penchant for incorporating keen pastoral insight into the text as well. He always interacts with other theologians, commentators, and portions of the Bible when interpreting a particular passage. Calvin's Commentary on Jonah, Micah, and Nahum is instructive and practical. It will prove useful to theologians and laypeople alike.

Commentary on Joshua
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In this volume, John Calvin provides an instructive commentary on the book of Joshua. Regarded as one of the Reformation's best interpreters of scripture, Calvin is an apt commentator. In particular, he frequently offers his own translations of a passage, explaining the subtleties and nuances of his translation. He has a penchant for incorporating keen pastoral insight into the text as well. He always interacts with other theologians, philosophers, commentators, and portions of the Bible when interpreting a particular passage. Calvin's Commentary on Joshua is instructive, engaging, and lively.

In these three volumes, Calvin provides an engaging commentary on the synoptic gospels--Matthew, Mark, and Luke. Calvin does not separate his treatment of the three, but comments on the three books as a whole. Of his commentaries, Calvin's Commentary on Matthew, Mark, and Luke is well-known--unsurprisingly, given the power, insight, and instruction it has. As always, Calvin's commentary has an eye towards everyday concerns and he incorporates a shrewd practical insight throughout. An important and useful commentary, Calvin's Commentary on Matthew, Mark, and Luke is deserving of study!

In these three volumes, Calvin provides an engaging commentary on the synoptic gospels--Matthew, Mark, and Luke. Calvin does not separate his treatment of the three, but comments on the three books as a whole. Of his commentaries, Calvin's Commentary on Matthew, Mark, and Luke is well-known--unsurprisingly, given the power, insight, and instruction it has. As always, Calvin's commentary has an eye towards everyday concerns and he incorporates a shrewd practical insight throughout. An important and useful commentary, Calvin's Commentary on Matthew, Mark, and Luke is deserving of study!

In these three volumes, Calvin provides an engaging commentary on the synoptic gospels--Matthew, Mark, and Luke. Calvin does not separate his treatment of the three, but comments on the three books as a whole. Of his commentaries, Calvin's Commentary on Matthew, Mark, and Luke is well-known--unsurprisingly, given the power, insight, and instruction it has. As always, Calvin's commentary has an eye towards everyday concerns and he incorporates a shrewd practical insight throughout. An important and useful commentary, Calvin's Commentary on Matthew, Mark, and Luke is deserving of study!

Commentary on Philippians, Colossians, and Thessalonians is another impressive commentary by Calvin on several Pauline epistles. Calvin is regarded as one of the Reformation's best interpreters of scripture. He frequently offers his own translations of a passage, explaining the subtleties and nuances of his translation. He has a penchant for incorporating keen pastoral insight into the text as well. He always interacts with other theologians, commentators, and portions of the Bible when interpreting a particular passage. Further, this volume also contains informative notes from the editor. Calvin's Commentary on Philippians, Colossians, and Thessalonians should not be ignored by anyone interested in those books or Calvin himself.

Calvin found Psalms to be one of the richest books in the Bible. As he writes in the introduction, "there is no other book in which we are more perfectly taught the right manner of praising God, or in which we are more powerfully stirred up to the performance of this religious exercise." This commentary--the last Calvin wrote--clearly expressed Calvin's deep love for this book. Calvin's Commentary on Psalms is thus one of his best commentaries, and one can greatly profit from reading even a portion of it.

Calvin found Psalms to be one of the richest books in the Bible. As he writes in the introduction, "there is no other book in which we are more perfectly taught the right manner of praising God, or in which we are more powerfully stirred up to the performance of this religious exercise." This commentary--the last Calvin wrote--clearly expressed Calvin's deep love for this book. Calvin's Commentary on Psalms is thus one of his best commentaries, and one can greatly profit from reading even a portion of it.

Calvin found Psalms to be one of the richest books in the Bible. As he writes in the introduction, "there is no other book in which we are more perfectly taught the right manner of praising God, or in which we are more powerfully stirred up to the performance of this religious exercise." This commentary--the last Calvin wrote--clearly expressed Calvin's deep love for this book. Calvin's Commentary on Psalms is thus one of his best commentaries, and one can greatly profit from reading even a portion of it.

Calvin found Psalms to be one of the richest books in the Bible. As he writes in the introduction, "there is no other book in which we are more perfectly taught the right manner of praising God, or in which we are more powerfully stirred up to the performance of this religious exercise." This commentary--the last Calvin wrote--clearly expressed Calvin's deep love for this book. Calvin's Commentary on Psalms is thus one of his best commentaries, and one can greatly profit from reading even a portion of it.

Calvin found Psalms to be one of the richest books in the Bible. As he writes in the introduction, "there is no other book in which we are more perfectly taught the right manner of praising God, or in which we are more powerfully stirred up to the performance of this religious exercise." This commentary--the last Calvin wrote--clearly expressed Calvin's deep love for this book. Calvin's Commentary on Psalms is thus one of his best commentaries, and one can greatly profit from reading even a portion of it.

Commentary on Romans
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Calvin's first commentary, Commentary on Romans is an impressive commentary, containing some of Calvin's most important views. Calvin is regarded as one of the Reformation's best interpreters of scripture. He frequently offers his own translations of a passage, explaining the subtleties and nuances of his translation. He has a penchant for incorporating keen pastoral insight into the text as well. He always interacts with other theologians, commentators, and portions of the Bible when interpreting a particular passage. Further, this volume also contains informative notes from the editor. Commentary on Romans should not be ignored by anyone interested in the book of Romans or John Calvin himself.

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Commentary on Timothy, Titus, and Philemon is another impressive commentary by Calvin on several Pauline epistles. Calvin is regarded as one of the Reformation's best interpreters of scripture. He frequently offers his own translations of a passage, explaining the subtleties and nuances of his translation. He has a penchant for incorporating keen pastoral insight into the text as well. He always interacts with other theologians, commentators, and portions of the Bible when interpreting a particular passage. Further, this volume also contains informative notes from the editor. Calvin's Commentary on Timothy, Titus, and Philemon should not be ignored by anyone interested in those books or Calvin himself.

In this small volume, John Calvin provides an interesting commentary on the books of Zechariah and Malachi. Regarded as one of the Reformation's best interpreters of scripture, Calvin is an apt commentator. In particular, he frequently offers his own translations of a passage, explaining the subtleties and nuances of his translation. He has a penchant for incorporating keen pastoral insight into the text as well. He always interacts with other theologians, commentators, and portions of the Bible when interpreting a particular passage. Calvin's Commentary on Zechariah and Malachi is instructive and practical. It will prove useful to theologians and laypeople alike.

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25 editions published.

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10 editions published.

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External Work.
10 editions published.

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Calvin's Harmony of the Law is his commentary on the books Exodus, Leviticus, Numbers, and Deuteronomy. Whereas the majority of Calvin's commentaries are chronologically arranged--beginning with the first verse in a book, and ending with the last--Harmony of the Law is arranged topically, for Calvin believed that his topical arrangement would better present the various doctrines of "true piety." A remarkable commentary, Harmony of the Law contains Calvin's discussion of the Ten Commandments, the usefulness of the law, and the harmony of the law. Harmony of the Law instructs readers in both the narrative history of the Old Testament and the practical importance and use of the Old Testament teachings. Harmony of the Law is highly recommended, and will demonstrate to a reader why Calvin is regarded as one of the best commentators of the Reformation.

Calvin's Harmony of the Law is his commentary on the books Exodus, Leviticus, Numbers, and Deuteronomy. Whereas the majority of Calvin's commentaries are chronologically arranged--beginning with the first verse in a book, and ending with the last--Harmony of the Law is arranged topically, for Calvin believed that his topical arrangement would better present the various doctrines of "true piety." A remarkable commentary, Harmony of the Law contains Calvin's discussion of the Ten Commandments, the usefulness of the law, and the harmony of the law. Harmony of the Law instructs readers in both the narrative history of the Old Testament and the practical importance and use of the Old Testament teachings. Harmony of the Law is highly recommended, and will demonstrate to a reader why Calvin is regarded as one of the best commentators of the Reformation.

Calvin's Harmony of the Law is his commentary on the books Exodus, Leviticus, Numbers, and Deuteronomy. Whereas the majority of Calvin's commentaries are chronologically arranged--beginning with the first verse in a book, and ending with the last--Harmony of the Law is arranged topically, for Calvin believed that his topical arrangement would better present the various doctrines of "true piety." A remarkable commentary, Harmony of the Law contains Calvin's discussion of the Ten Commandments, the usefulness of the law, and the harmony of the law. Harmony of the Law instructs readers in both the narrative history of the Old Testament and the practical importance and use of the Old Testament teachings. Harmony of the Law is highly recommended, and will demonstrate to a reader why Calvin is regarded as one of the best commentators of the Reformation.

Calvin's Harmony of the Law is his commentary on the books Exodus, Leviticus, Numbers, and Deuteronomy. Whereas the majority of Calvin's commentaries are chronologically arranged--beginning with the first verse in a book, and ending with the last--Harmony of the Law is arranged topically, for Calvin believed that his topical arrangement would better present the various doctrines of "true piety." A remarkable commentary, Harmony of the Law contains Calvin's discussion of the Ten Commandments, the usefulness of the law, and the harmony of the law. Harmony of the Law instructs readers in both the narrative history of the Old Testament and the practical importance and use of the Old Testament teachings. Harmony of the Law is highly recommended, and will demonstrate to a reader why Calvin is regarded as one of the best commentators of the Reformation.

Published first in 1536, the Institutes of the Christian Religion is John Calvin's magnum opus. Extremely important for the Protestant Reformation, the Institutes has remained important for Protestant theology for almost five centuries. Written to "aid those who desire to be instructed in the doctrine of salvation," the Institutes, which follows the ordering of the Apostle's Creed, has four parts. The first part examines God the Father; the second part, the Son; the third part, the Holy Spirit; and the fourth part, the Church. Through these four parts, it explores both "knowledge of God" and "knowledge of ourselves" with profound theological insight, challenging and informing all the while. Thus, for either the recent convert or the long-time believer, for the inquisitive beginner or the serious scholar, John Calvin's Institutes of the Christian Religion is a rewarding book worthy of study!

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71 editions published.

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12 editions published.

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10 editions published.

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The Daily Benefits Derived from It. This treatise on prayer comes from Book III, Chapter 20 of Calvin's magnum opus, Institutes of the Christian Religion. In it, Calvin answers questions concerning to whom Christians should address their prayers, how they should formulate prayers, and what practices may benefit or injure the development of a prayerful life. As he seeks answers to these questions, Calvin meditates on the Lord's Prayer as a model for meaningful, righteous praying. His inquiry and meditation possess the same degree of scriptural and theological scholarship that characterize the wider body of his work. Although one can read these words on prayer simply because of their immense influence upon history, they can still challenge and instruct us today.

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6 editions published.

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This devotional book, written for the purpose of teaching Christians how to live out their faith, is divided into five sections. First, Calvin tells us that every follower of Christ loves righteousness and is called to righteousness. The following chapters suggest ways to go about seeking righteousness. In answering Christ's call to live rightly, Calvin stresses the importance of constant patience and clinging to the grace given through Christ's death and resurrection. As Christians seek to order their lives around these principles, they must meditate upon God's plan for the future and how to make that future a reality. Finally, Calvin proposes a few ways how each person can bring God's grace to a fallen world and avoid abusing their roles as representatives of God to that world. This very brief text can serve as a short introduction to Calvin's thought for any who wish to broaden their general knowledge or set out on a path of more involved study.

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12 editions published.

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